Tag Archives: dance

Freedom of Speech and Movement Acts

rousseve_webbanner_new

Presented in conjunction with Saudade… Freedom of Speech and Movement: a dance workshop at Hull-House Museum:

Freedom of Speech and Movement Acts Movement Workshop with Taisha Pagget of the David Roussève/REALITY dance company

Thursday, March 12, 12-1:30 p.m.
Jane Addams Hull-House Museum
800 S. Halsted Ave.

This workshop is free and open to the public- dancers and non-dancers alike.

The dance studio is a social space, where the problems of movement and choreography bring up problems of authority, hierarchy, participation and decision-making. This movement workshop will take up these questions, offering tools and exercises that develop creative freedom in our bodies, as both dancers and citizens acting within larger collective structures.

Jane Adams Hull-House Museum Art & Democracy Series
For more information or to RSVP: 312.413.5353 (Jane Adams Hull-House Museum)


Bittersweet REALITY at Columbia College

rousseve-reality

from the Columbia College website:

March 12, 13 & 14 at 8:00 p.m., The Dance Center of Columbia College presents “shattering dance/theater”(The New York Times). Named after a Portugese expression, Saudade is an ode to the idea of “bittersweet,” the single moment when the greatest joy and agony are experienced together. Set to Portugese Fado music and grounded in folklore, historical fact and personal experience, Saudade is a mosaic of character monologues, mixing world dance with stories of disenfranchised southern African Americans in a deeply personal statement about modern times. With equal parts wild humor and grit, Saudade is performed by Roussève and a distinguished cast of six dancers [known as REALITY], including practitioners of South Asian, Indonesian, West African and postmodern dance forms.

colum.edu

NOTE:

While “Saudade” means “bittersweet longing for what has gone”, “Chega de Saudade” (alternately), is roughly translated to mean “No More Blues”.  “Chega de Saudade” is also a Brasilian popular song performed by João Gilberto (below).

Vai minha tristeza
E diz a ela
Que sem ela não pode ser
Diz-lhe numa prece
Que ela regresse
Porque eu não posso mais sofrer

translated:

“Go on, my sadness
And tell her
That without her it cannot be
Tell her in a prayer
To come back to me
Because I cannot suffer anymore”


The Break/s: a mixtape for the stage

bamuthithe break/s: a mixtape for the stage

Marc Bamuthi Joseph

March 26th thru March 28th at the Museum of Contemporary Art

I am really looking forward to this.

NOTE: If you haven’t read Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip Hop Generation by Jeff Chang…..do.

from the MCA website:

“Poet and performer Marc Bamuthi Joseph conveys the history of the hip-hop generation through his own personal coming-of-age story using verse, dance, and film in this dramatic multimedia performance, a “mixtape for the stage.” Joseph collaborates with award-winning author Jeff Chang, whose book Can’t Stop Won’t Stop captures the creation of the hip-hop culture as a local, political, and artistic movement. To embrace the power of improvisation, the sound score and visual projections are mixed in the moment by a DJ and a beatboxer.

Tickets $25, MCA members $20
Buy Tickets Online
or call the MCA Box Office, 312.397.4010


krylon-blackalso coming (sooner):
New America: Marc Bamuthi Joseph and Jeff Chang in conversation
Saturday, February 28, 2009, 2 pm
MCA Theater
$10, $8 members, $6 students
$6 with performance ticket for the break/s – the break/s ticket-holders must reserve tickets in advance for the talk.

from the MCA Site: 

“Marc Bamuthi Joseph, leading poet and performer, and renowned writer Jeff Chang, come together for a public conversation about their own creative trajectories and the power of hip-hop to reshape the American and global cultural landscape at this historic moment in US politics. Drawing from their own experiences working for change through youth and community organizing, media justice, culture, the arts, and hip-hop activism, they discuss how a new understanding of American culture is both possible and necessary. Stephanie Shonekan, Black World Studies Director at Columbia College, facilitates this dialogue.”

Illustration above,  Austin Auandee