Tag Archives: Sculpture

Objet Petit Ahh… aka the Piñata-Palooza.

from our friends at the Co-Prosperity Sphere in Bridgeport:

Objet Petit Ahh… is a single-evening exhibition and smashing party of artist-created piñata-sculptures.

In what could be the most destructive art exhibition in the history of Chicago, all of the artwork in the show will be obliterated by the show’s closing that evening. Whatever various and sundry contents should spill forth from the piñata sculptures will immediately be considered public property.

A User-Directed Super Raffle™ will determine the privilege of smashing each piñata, and all proceeds will go to benefit Version Festival 12. Each raffle ticket is $2. If you buy 5 tickets for $10 you will get a copy of the just released Proximity #009.

PLUS! In addition to the curated piñatas in the exhibition, the event will conclude with a Bring Your Own Piñata finale. Anyone attending the show may bring a piñata to add to the fun. Plus, all BYOP’s will be exhibited until the finale, so basically, yeah, you’re in the show. Put it on your resume… Whatever!

The beer’s free, but BYOP(iñata)!


April 14, 2012
6pm… 11pm-sih
3219 S Morgan St


Garland M. Taylor: Chicago’s otherworldly metalsmith

When I met Garland Taylor recently, it was at a Jazz concert held on the lawn of Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art. I commented on his sandals (brown leather that appeared to be custom), and he proceeded to tell me about how he blew all of his money on them some years back while interning with a metalworking artist in Italy. So far, they were still holding up, he said. The investment had not been in vain. Shoes do, in fact, tell stories.

Speaking of stories, Taylor says of his work:

“[It is] informed by characteristics of people, and designs in nature. My sculptures are short stories that illuminate the evidence of my labor, that is, my struggle to create logic, balance, and harmony with welding electrodes and tiny pieces of steel discards from railroad maintenance crews, the construction trades, and the manufacturing industry.”

According to his website, his works “deal with improving that which has fallen into decline.”

Unassuming and friendly, Taylor has a studio not too far from Bronzeville on the South Side, and he creates otherworldly metal sculptures utilizing reclaimed materials, slick finishes suited for an automobile, and organic yet mechanical forms. Jive on!

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Marion Perkins: Sculpted a Better Chicago, a Better World

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Woodson Regional is a gem of the South Side.  I’ve always believed that.  One of my favorite locations of the Chicago Public Library, bar none.  The library, located at 95th and Halsted, boasts the Vivian Harsh Research Collection (all manner of Black Ephemera) and a really strong overall collection.  1 of only two regional libraries in the city (the others, save Harold Washington downtown are all “branches”), Woodson is stocked with literature and art from a good number of local sociologists, artists, and writers.  Case in point,  the temporary exhibit celebrating the Art (and activism) of sculptor Marion Perkins

Born in 1908, he moved to Chicago as a small child.  He worked as a dishwasher, freight handler, and postal clerk in his lifetime, and though in his artistic career he was lauded with awards (among them the Guggenheim Fellowship) he was never able to devote full time to his art.  Perkins was not only an artist, he was an activist for social change, fighting for both Ethiopian freedom and civil rights in his own backyard.

Visit Woodson for Woodson’s sake, but don’t forget to carve out time to see the temporary exhibit: “To See Reality in a New Light: the Art and Activism of Marion Perkins”, at Woodson until December 31, 2009.